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Connect to WiFi Network From Command Line In Linux


How many of you failed to connect to WiFi network in Linux? Did you bumped into issues like the followings in different forums, discussion page, blogs? I am sure everyone did at some point. Following list shows just the results from Page 1 of a Google search result with “Unable to connect to WiFi network in Linux” keywords.Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - blackMORE Ops

  1. Cannot connect to wifi at home after upgrade to ubuntu 14.04
  2. Arch Linux not connecting to Wifi anymore
  3. I can’t connect to my wifi
  4. Cannot connect to WiFi
  5. Ubuntu 13.04 can detect wi-fi but can’t connect
  6. Unable to connect to wireless network ath9k
  7. Crazy! I can see wireless network but can’t connect
  8. Unable to connect to Wifi Access point in Debian 7
  9. Unable to connect Wireless

Following guide explains how you can connect to a WiFi network in Linux from command Line. This guide will take you through the steps for connecting to a WPA/WPA2 WiFi network.

Contents

  • WiFi network from command line – Required tools
  • Linux WPA/WPA2/IEEE 802.1X Supplicant
    • iw – Linux Wireless
    • ip – ip program in Linux
    • ping
  • Step 1: Find available WiFi adapters – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 2: Check device status – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 3: Bring up the WiFi interface – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 4: Check the connection status – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 5: Scan to find WiFi Network – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 6: Generate a wpa/wpa2 configuration file – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 7: Connect to WPA/WPA2 WiFi network – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 8: Get an IP using dhclient – WiFi network from command line
  • Step 9: Test connectivity – WiFi network from command line
  • Conclusion

WiFi network from command line – Required tools

Following tools are required to connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line

  1. wpa_supplicant
  2. iw
  3. ip
  4. ping

Before we jump into technical jargons let’s just quickly go over each item at a time.

Linux WPA/WPA2/IEEE 802.1X Supplicant

wpa_supplicant is a WPA Supplicant for Linux, BSD, Mac OS X, and Windows with support for WPA and WPA2 (IEEE 802.11i / RSN). It is suitable for both desktop/laptop computers and embedded systems. Supplicant is the IEEE 802.1X/WPA component that is used in the client stations. It implements key negotiation with a WPA Authenticator and it controls the roaming and IEEE 802.11 authentication/association of the wlan driver.

iw – Linux Wireless

iw is a new nl80211 based CLI configuration utility for wireless devices. It supports all new drivers that have been added to the kernel recently. The old tool iwconfing, which uses Wireless Extensions interface, is deprecated and it’s strongly recommended to switch to iw and nl80211.

ip – ip program in Linux

ip is used to show / manipulate routing, devices, policy routing and tunnels. It is used for enabling/disabling devices and it helps you to find general networking informations. ip was written by Alexey N. Kuznetsov and added in Linux 2.2. Use man ip to see full help/man page.

ping

Good old ping For every ping, there shall be a pong …. ping-pong – ping-pong – ping-pong … that should explain it.

BTW man ping helps too …

Step 1: Find available WiFi adapters – WiFi network from command line

This actually help .. I mean you need to know your WiFi device name before you go an connect to a WiFi network. So just use the following command that will list all the connected WiFi adapters in your Linux machines.

root@kali:~# iw dev
phy#1
    Interface wlan0
        ifindex 4
        type managed
root@kali:~#

Let me explain the output:

This system has 1 physical WiFi adapters.

  1. Designated name: phy#1
  2. Device names: wlan0
  3. Interface Index: 4. Usually as per connected ports (which can be an USB port).
  4. Type: Managed. Type specifies the operational mode of the wireless devices. managed means the device is a WiFi station or client that connects to an access point.

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Find WiFi adapters - blackMORE Ops-1

Step 2: Check device status – WiFi network from command line

By this time many of you are thinking, why two network devices. The reason I am using two is because I would like to show how a connected and disconnected device looks like side by side. Next command will show you exactly that.

You can check that if the wireless device is up or not using the following command:

root@kali:~# ip link show wlan0
4: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state DOWN mode DORMANT qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:60:64:37:4a:30 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
root@kali:~# 

As you can already see, I got once interface (wlan0) as state UP and wlan1 as state DOWN.

Look for the word “UP” inside the brackets in the first line of the output.

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Check device status- blackMORE Ops-2

In the above example, wlan1 is not UP. Execute the following command to

Step 3: Bring up the WiFi interface – WiFi network from command line

Use the following command to bring up the WiFI interface

root@kali:~# ip link set wlan0 up

Note: If you’re using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, CentOS, Fedora etc. use the command with ‘sudo’ prefix

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Bring device up - blackMORE Ops-3

If you run the show link command again, you can tell that wlan1 is now UP.

root@kali:~# ip link show wlan0
4: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP mode DORMANT qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:60:64:37:4a:30 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
root@kali:~# 

Step 4: Check the connection status – WiFi network from command line

You can check WiFi network connection status from command line using the following command

root@kali:~# iw wlan0 link
Not connected.
root@kali:~# 

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Check device connection - blackMORE Ops-4

The above output shows that you are not connected to any network.

Step 5: Scan to find WiFi Network – WiFi network from command line

Scan to find out what WiFi network(s) are detected

root@kali:~# iw wlan0 scan
BSS 9c:97:26:de:12:37 (on wlan0)
    TSF: 5311608514951 usec (61d, 11:26:48)
    freq: 2462
    beacon interval: 100
    capability: ESS Privacy ShortSlotTime (0x0411)
    signal: -53.00 dBm 
    last seen: 104 ms ago
    Information elements from Probe Response frame:
    SSID: blackMOREOps
    Supported rates: 1.0* 2.0* 5.5* 11.0* 18.0 24.0 36.0 54.0 
    DS Parameter set: channel 11
    ERP: Barker_Preamble_Mode
    RSN:     * Version: 1
         * Group cipher: CCMP
         * Pairwise ciphers: CCMP
         * Authentication suites: PSK
         * Capabilities: 16-PTKSA-RC (0x000c)
    Extended supported rates: 6.0 9.0 12.0 48.0 
---- truncated ----

The 2 important pieces of information from the above are the SSID and the security protocol (WPA/WPA2 vs WEP). The SSID from the above example is blackMOREOps. The security protocol is RSN, also commonly referred to as WPA2. The security protocol is important because it determines what tool you use to connect to the network.

— following image is a sample only —

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Scan Wifi Network using iw - blackMORE Ops - 5

Step 6: Generate a wpa/wpa2 configuration file – WiFi network from command line

Now we will generate a configuration file for wpa_supplicant that contains the pre-shared key (“passphrase“) for the WiFi network.

root@kali:~# wpa_passphrase blackMOREOps >> /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf
abcd1234
root@kali:~#
(where 'abcd1234' was the Network password)

wpa_passphrase uses SSID as a string, that means you need to type in the passphrase for the WiFi networkblackMOREOps after you run the command.

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Connect to WPA WPA2 WiFi network - blackMORE Ops - 6

Note: If you’re using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, CentOS, Fedora etc. use the command with ‘sudo’ prefix

wpa_passphrase will create the necessary configuration entries based on your input. Each new network will be added as a new configuration (it wont replace existing configurations) in the configurations file /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf.

root@kali:~# cat /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf 
# reading passphrase from stdin
network={
 ssid="blackMOREOps"
 #psk="abcd1234"
 psk=42e1cbd0f7fbf3824393920ea41ad6cc8528957a80a404b24b5e4461a31c820c
}
root@kali:~# 

Step 7: Connect to WPA/WPA2 WiFi network – WiFi network from command line

Now that we have the configuration file, we can use it to connect to the WiFi network. We will be usingwpa_supplicant to connect. Use the following command

root@kali:~# wpa_supplicant -B -D wext -i wlan0 -c /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf
ioctl[SIOCSIWENCODEEXT]: Invalid argument 
ioctl[SIOCSIWENCODEEXT]: Invalid argument 
root@kali:~#

Where,

  • -B means run wpa_supplicant in the background.
  • -D specifies the wireless driver. wext is the generic driver.
  • -c specifies the path for the configuration file.

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Connect to WPA WPA2 WiFi network - blackMORE Ops - 7

Use the iw command to verify that you are indeed connected to the SSID.

root@kali:~# iw wlan0 link
Connected to 9c:97:00:aa:11:33 (on wlan0)
    SSID: blackMOREOps
    freq: 2412
    RX: 26951 bytes (265 packets)
    TX: 1400 bytes (14 packets)
    signal: -51 dBm
    tx bitrate: 6.5 MBit/s MCS 0

    bss flags:    short-slot-time
    dtim period:    0
    beacon int:    100

Step 8: Get an IP using dhclient – WiFi network from command line

Until step 7, we’ve spent time connecting to the WiFi network. Now use dhclient to get an IP address by DHCP

root@kali:~# dhclient wlan0
Reloading /etc/samba/smb.conf: smbd only.
root@kali:~#

You can use ip or ifconfig command to verify the IP address assigned by DHCP. The IP address is 10.0.0.4from below.

root@kali:~# ip addr show wlan0
4: wlan0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq state UP qlen 1000
    link/ether 00:60:64:37:4a:30 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
    inet 10.0.0.4/24 brd 10.0.0.255 scope global wlan0
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
    inet6 fe80::260:64ff:fe37:4a30/64 scope link 
       valid_lft forever preferred_lft forever
root@kali:~# 

(or)

root@kali:~# ifconfig wlan0
wlan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:60:64:37:4a:30 
 inet addr:10.0.0.4 Bcast:10.0.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
 inet6 addr: fe80::260:64ff:fe37:4a30/64 Scope:Link
 UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
 RX packets:23868 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
 TX packets:23502 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
 RX bytes:22999066 (21.9 MiB) TX bytes:5776947 (5.5 MiB)

root@kali:~# 

Add default routing rule.The last configuration step is to make sure that you have the proper routing rules.

root@kali:~# ip route show 
default via 10.0.0.138 dev wlan0 
10.0.0.0/24 dev wlan0  proto kernel  scope link  src 10.0.0.4 

Connect to WiFi network in Linux from command line - Check Routing and DHCP - blackMORE Ops - 8

Step 9: Test connectivity – WiFi network from command line

Ping Google’s IP to confirm network connection (or you can just browse?)

root@kali:~# ping 8.8.8.8
PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=3 ttl=42 time=265 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=4 ttl=42 time=176 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=5 ttl=42 time=174 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=6 ttl=42 time=174 ms
^C
--- 8.8.8.8 ping statistics ---
6 packets transmitted, 4 received, 33% packet loss, time 5020ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 174.353/197.683/265.456/39.134 ms
root@kali:~# 

Conclusion

This is a very detailed and long guide. Here is a short summary of all the things you need to do in just few line.

root@kali:~# iw dev
root@kali:~# ip link set wlan0 up
root@kali:~# iw wlan0 scan
root@kali:~# wpa_passphrase blackMOREOps >> /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf
root@kali:~# wpa_supplicant -i wlan0 -c /etc/wpa_supplicant.conf
root@kali:~# iw wlan0 link
root@kali:~# dhclient wlan0
root@kali:~# ping 8.8.8.8
(Where wlan0 is wifi adapter and blackMOREOps is SSID)
(Add Routing manually)
root@kali:~# ip route add default via 10.0.0.138 dev wlan0

At the end of it, you should be able to connect to WiFi network. Depending on the Linux distro you are using and how things go, your commands might be slightly different. Edit commands as required to meet your needs.

Retrieving your wifi password from the command line


Since Linux, at least in Ubuntu, retrieve password for your wifi or any wireless networks you’ve connected to before, it is very easy, since the properties of the network configuration, you can access them.

This entry as you said the title is focused on using the command line. Since Ubuntu Linux, for other distributions will equal or somehow very similar, we just run:

sudo cat /etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/ SSID | grep psk=

Where SSID is the name of your connection. I have not tested for all types of configurations, but at least it works for WPA2-PSK.

If you use Mac OS X here have a script that does the above and if you are using Windows this one . I personally have not tried any of these scripts, so you can not say that work.

Debian Wireless Fidelity


Portal/IDB/icon-wifi-32x32.png This portal deals with the installation and configuration of WiFi devices. Device installation is essentially a two-part process: 1) installing the driver (also called a module) and 2) setting up your WiFi interface.

A WiFi device operates on an electronic chip called a “chipset”. We can find the same chipset in several different devices. Consequently, the driver/module for one chipset will work for all wireless devices using that chipset.

Free software based systems such as Debian depend on the cooperation between manufacturers and developers to produce and maintain quality drivers and firmware. Drivers and firmware are what determine if and how well your hardware works.

Debian’s Social Contract mandates the freeing of the distribution. In practice this means manufacturers are required to cooperate by releasing specifications and free drivers that can be worked on by the community. Newer versions of Debian (6+) do not include non-free drivers or firmware.

Non-free drivers and firmware are produced by companies refusing or unable to cooperate with the free software community. With non-free drivers and firmware support is often unavailable or severely strained. For instance features are often left out, bugs go unfixed, and what support does exist from the manufacture is fleeting.

By encouraging good social practices the community is able to support end-users. Complex installation procedures are no longer required and support continues long after a product has been discontinued.

Currently there are only a few modern wifi chipsets readily available that work with free software systems. For USB wifi devices this list includes the Realtek RTL8187B chipset (802.11G) and the Atheros AR9170 chipset (802.11N). For Mini PCIe all cards with an Atheros chipset are supported.

Wifi has always been a problem for free software users. USB Wifi cards are becoming less free. With the older 802.11G standard many USB wifi cards had free drivers and did not require non-free firmware. With 802.11N there is only one chipset on the market from Atheros which is completely free.

One company which specialises in free software and sells 802.11N USB wifi cards, ThinkPenguin.com, has indicated the availability of free software supported 802.11N USB wifi cards is disappearing. Solving this problem will require more demand than currently exists. Next time you purchase a piece of hardware ask yourself if it is free software compatible.

Continuing on, a WiFi interface is an Ethernet interface which also provides WiFi-specific configuration parameters. These parameters are controlled using the iwconfig program.

www.debian.org/doc/manuals/debian-reference/ch05 – Debian Reference Chapter 5 – Network setup

Prerequisites

  • wireless-tools, tools for manipulating Linux Wireless Extensions (installed by default on Desktop & Laptop installations)

  • For GUI systems:
    1. NetworkManager (installed by default on Gnome-Desktop & Laptop installation)

    2. wicd, a wired and wireless manager, is recommended for other environments without GNOME dependencies such as XFCE, Fluxbox, Openbox, Enlightenment.

  • wpasupplicant, client support for WPA and WPA2 networks

If these are missing, you can install these via:

aptitude install wireless-tools

…and similar

Install Driver

Before you buy, verify your intended device is supported by an available Linux driver. A good indication of support is Tux being displayed on the product’s packaging.

This section presents general lists of WiFi devices (grouped by host interface) and sorted by driver/module name. Each list has two main elements: the module name and the chipset(s) it supports. Known unsupported chipsets are at the end of each list.

If available, a help page link will provide you with further information. We recommend you read the associated help page, as some devices may require to be supplied with microcode (aka “firmware”) before they can be used.

For an indication of support with a specific device, see the Wireless Adapter Chipset Directory.

PCI Devices

See HowToIdentifyADevice/PCI for more information

module name

Device name(s)

help page

free (?)

acx-mac80211

Texas Instruments chipsets (ACX100/TNETW1100, ACX111/TNETW1130)

acx

X-(

adm8211

ADMtek ADM8211 chipset

adm8211

{OK}

airo

?airo

?

arlan

?arlan

?

ath5k

Atheros Communications chipsets (AR5210, AR5211, AR5212, AR5213, AR5414, AR2413, AR242x)

ath5k

{OK}

ath9k

Atheros Communications 802.11n chipsets

ath9k

{OK}

atmel_pci

Atmel at76c506 chipset

atmel_pci

X-(

b43
b43legacy

Broadcom chipsets

bcm43xx

X-(

brcm80211
brcmsmac

Broadcom chipsets (BCM4313, BCM43224, BCM43225)

brcm80211

X-(

hostap_pci
hostap_plx

Intersil Prism 2/2.5/3 chipsets

hostap

{OK} /X-( 1

ipw2100
ipw2200

Intel PRO/Wireless 2100
Intel PRO/Wireless 2200
Intel PRO/Wireless 2915

ipw2200

X-(

iwl3945
iwl4965

Intel PRO/Wireless 3945
Intel PRO/Wireless 4965

iwlegacy

X-(

iwlagn
iwlwifi

Intel Wireless WiFi Link
Intel Wireless-N
Intel Advanced-N
Intel Ultimate-N

iwlwifi

X-(

mwl8k

Marvell chipsets (88W8363, 88W8366, 88W8687)

mwl8k

X-(

orinoco_nortel
orinoco_plx
orinoco_tmd

Lucent/Agere Hermes and Intersil Prism 2/2.5/3 chipsets

orinoco

{OK} /X-( 2

p54pci

Intersil Prism54 chipsets (ISL3877, ISL3880, ISL3886, ISL3890)

prism54

X-(

r8192_pci
r8192e_pci

Realtek RTL8192E chipset

rtl819x

X-(

rt2400pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2400/RT2460, RT2401/RT2460)

rt2400pci

{OK}

rt2500pci

Ralink RT2500/RT2560 chipset

WiFi/rt2500

{OK}

rt2800pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2760, RT2790, RT2860, RT2890, RT3060, RT3062, RT3090, RT3091, RT3092, RT3390, RT3562, RT3592, RT5390)

rt2800pci

X-(

rt2860sta

Ralink chipsets (RT2760/RT2790/RT2860/RT2890, RT3090/RT3091/RT3092)

rt2860sta

X-( {i}

rt61pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2501/2561, RT2600/RT2661)

rt61pci

X-(

rtl8180

Realtek chipsets (RTL8180, RTL8185)

rtl818x

{OK}

r8187se
rtl8187se

Realtek RTL8187SE chipset

rtl818x

{OK}

rtl8192ce

Realtek chipsets (RTL8188CE, RTL8192CE)

rtl819x

X-(

rtl8192de

Realtek chipsets (RTL8188DE, RTL8192DE)

rtl819x

X-(

rtl8192se

Realtek chipsets (RTL8191SE, RTL8192SE)

rtl819x

X-(

strip

?strip

?

wavelan

?wavelan

?

wl

Broadcom chipsets (BCM4311, BCM4312, BCM4313, BCM4321, BCM4322, BCM43224, BCM43225, BCM43227, BCM43228)

wl

X-(

Atheros Communications AR5005VL (AR5513) chipset [168c:0020]

NdisWrapper

{X}

InProComm IPN 2120 chipset [17fe:2120]

NdisWrapper

{X}

InProComm IPN 2220 chipset [17fe:2220]

NdisWrapper

{X}

Marvell Libertas 88W8335 chipset [11ab:1faa]

NdisWrapper

{X}

WavePlus WP1200 chipset [17f7:0001]

NdisWrapper

{X}

Legend :
{OK} = OK ; {X} Unsupported(No Driver) ; /!\ = Error (Couldn’t get it working); [?] Unknown, Not Test ; [-] Not-applicable
{i} = Configuration Required; X-( = Only works with a proprietary driver and/or firmware

  • An extended list of PCI-IDs to kernel-module mapping is available at DeviceDatabase/PCI.

USB Devices

See HowToIdentifyADevice/USB for more information

module name

Device name(s)

help page

free (?)

acx-mac80211

Texas Instruments chipsets (ACX100USB, TNETW1450)

acx

X-(

ar5523

Atheros Communications chipsets (AR5005UG, AR5005UX)

ar5523

X-(

ar9170usb

Atheros Communications AR9170 chipset

ar9170usb

{OK} /X-( 3

at76c50x-usb
at76_usb

Atmel chipsets (at76c503, at76c505, at76c505a)

at76_usb

X-(

ath9k_htc

Atheros Communications chipsets (AR9271, AR7010)

ath9k_htc

{OK} 4/ X-(

carl9170

Atheros Communications AR9170 chipset

carl9170

{OK}

orinoco_usb

Lucent/Agere Hermes chipset

orinoco_usb

X-(

p54usb

Intersil Prism54 chipsets (ISL3886, ISL3887)

prism54

X-(

prism2_usb

Intersil Prism 2/2.5/3 chipsets

linux-wlan-ng

{OK}

r8712u
r8192s_usb

Realtek chipsets (RTL8188SU, RTL8191SU, RTL8192SU)

rtl819x

X-(

r8192u_usb

Realtek RTL8192U chipset

rtl819x

X-(

rndis_wlan

Broadcom BCM4320 chipset

rndis_wlan

{OK}

rt2500usb

Ralink RT2500USB/RT2571 chipset

rt2500usb

{OK}

rt2800usb

Ralink chipsets (RT2070, RT2770, RT2870, RT3070, RT3071, RT3072, RT3370, RT3572, RT5370)

rt2800usb

X-(

rt2870sta

Ralink chipsets (RT2770/RT2870, RT3070/RT3071/RT3072)

rt2870sta

X-(

rt73usb

Ralink RT2501USB/RT2571W chipset

WiFi/rt73

X-(

rtl8187

Realtek chipsets (RTL8187, RTL8187B)

rtl818x

{OK}

rtl8192cu

Realtek chipsets (RTL8188CE-VAU, RTL8188CUS, RTL8192CU)

rtl819x

X-(

usb8xxx

Marvell Libertas 88W8388 chipset

libertas

X-(

vt6656_stage

VIA VT6656 chipset

vt665x

X-(

zd1201

ZyDAS ZD1201 chipset

zd1201

X-(

zd1211rw

ZyDAS ZD1211/1211B and Atheros AR5007UG chipsets

zd1211rw

X-(

Netgear MA111v2 [0846:4230]

NdisWrapper

{X}

Netgear WN111v1 [0846:9000]

NdisWrapper

{X}

TRENDware TEW-424UB v2 [0457:0163]

NdisWrapper

{X}

  • An extended list of USB-IDs to kernel-module mapping is available at DeviceDatabase/USB.

PC Card (PCMCIA) Devices

See HowToIdentifyADevice/PC_Card for more information

module name

Device name(s)

help page

free (?)

acx-mac80211

Texas Instruments chipsets (ACX100/TNETW1100, ACX111/TNETW1130)

acx

X-(

adm8211

ADMtek ADM8211 chipset

adm8211

{OK}

airo_cs

?airo_cs

?

ath5k

Atheros Communications chipsets (AR5210, AR5211, AR5212, AR5213, AR5414)

ath5k

{OK}

ath9k

Atheros Communications 802.11n chipsets

ath9k

{OK}

atmel_cs

Atmel chipsets (at76c502x, at76c504x)

atmel_cs

X-(

b43
b43legacy

Broadcom chipsets

bcm43xx

X-(

hostap_cs

Intersil Prism 2/2.5/3 chipsets

hostap

{OK} /X-( 1

netwave_cs

?netwave cs

?

orinoco_cs

Lucent/Agere Hermes and Intersil Prism 2/2.5/3 chipsets

orinoco

{OK} /X-( 2

p54pci

Intersil Prism54 chipsets (ISL3877, ISL3880, ISL3886, ISL3890)

prism54

X-(

ray_cs

?ray cs

?

rt2400pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2400/RT2460, RT2401/RT2460)

rt2400pci

{OK}

rt2500pci

Ralink RT2500/RT2560 chipset

WiFi/rt2500

{OK}

rt2800pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2760, RT2790, RT2860, RT2890, RT3060, RT3062, RT3090, RT3091, RT3092, RT3390, RT3562, RT3592, RT5390)

rt2800pci

X-(

rt2860sta

Ralink chipsets (RT2760/RT2790/RT2860/RT2890, RT3090/RT3091/RT3092)

rt2860sta

X-(

rt61pci

Ralink chipsets (RT2501/2561, RT2600/RT2661)

rt61pci

X-(

rtl8180

Realtek chipsets (RTL8180, RTL8185)

rtl818x

{OK}

spectrum_cs

Symbol Spectrum24 Trilogy chipsets

orinoco

{OK} /X-( 5

wavelan_cs

?wavelan/cs

?

wl

Broadcom chipsets (BCM4311, BCM4312, BCM4313, BCM4321, BCM4322)

wl

X-(

wl3501_cs

?wl3501/cs

?

Atheros Communications AR5005VL (AR5513) chipset [168c:0020]

NdisWrapper

{X}

InProComm IPN 2120 chipset [17fe:2120]

NdisWrapper

{X}

Marvell Libertas 88W8335 chipset [11ab:1faa]

NdisWrapper

{X}

WavePlus WP1200 chipset [17f7:0002]

NdisWrapper

{X}

ZyDAS ZD1201 chipset (16-bit PC Cards)

n/a

{X}

Routers

module name

Device name(s)

help page

free (?)

source code

Linksys WRT54GC

Wikipedia; it isn’t similar to the WRT54G; The WRT54GC is based on the Sercomm IP806SM reference design the same chipset as the current Linksys WTY54G the Airlink101 AR315W, Alloy WRT2454AP, and Hawking HWR54G. You also can useNdisWrapper

X-(

Configure Interface

Your wireless network interface can be configured using a connection manager or Debian’s network interface configuration file (/etc/network/interfaces).

Graphical Network Connection Tools:

Network Manager for GNOME (network-manager) or wicd

For more information, please see WiFi/HowToUse.

Resources